The Printable KISS Grammar Workbooks January 2010
Vincent van Gogh's
(1853-1890)
Self-Portrait
with Bandaged Ear
1889 
Identifying Nouns and Pronouns

Nouns

     Words that name people, places, or things are nouns:
dad, sister, friend, Mr. Jones,
park, school, New York,
tree, apple, car, air, idea, health
Note that many nouns name things that you can see, but others name things such as "air," "idea," or "health" that cannot be seen.

Pronouns
     Pronouns are words that act like nouns but do not name specific people, places, or things. They are often used to take the place of nouns:
Karla and George went to the store.
They went to the store.
Pronouns can stand in for a noun anywhere in a sentence.

     The following words can be pronouns. You need not remember the top row ("Subjects," etc.). It is there to suggest how the different pronouns function in sentences.

Subjects Objects Possessive Intensive
I
we
you
he
she
it
they
who
me
us
(you)
him
her
(it)
them
whom
mine
ours
yours
his
hers
its
theirs
myself
ourselves
yourself (yourselves)
himself
herself
itself
themselves

     Other words that can be pronouns are:

which, what, this, that
some, someone, something, somebody
any, anyone, anything, anybody

Some of these words, like "his," her," "this," "that," "some," or "any" can be pronouns, but sometimes they function as adjectives:

Where is his book?
His is in the car.

This tastes good (PA).
This ice cream tastes good (PA).

      Similarly, some words can be nouns or verbs. The real test is how a word functions in a sentence. "Fish," for example, can be a noun or a verb:
 

Noun: The fish were swimming in the pond.
They were watching the fish (DO).
Verb: Billy and Jane fish in the pond.