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A Punctuation Exercise
Based on The Story of Miss Moppet, by Beatrix Potter

The original text is:

The Mouse watches Miss Moppet from the top of the cupboard.
Miss Moppet ties up her head in a duster, and sits before the fire. 
The Mouse thinks she is looking very ill. He comes sliding down the bell-pull.
Miss Moppet looks worse and worse. The Mouse comes a little nearer.
Why "Mouse" is capitalized can be an interesting point of discussion. The comma after "duster" is optional, but it does suggest that time passed between the time that she tied her hair and then sat.

FYI Analysis Key

The Mouse watches Miss Moppet (DO) {from the top} {of the cupboard}. |

Miss Moppet ties up her head (DO) {in a duster}, and sits {before the fire}. |

The Mouse thinks [DO she is looking very ill [#1] ]. | He comes sliding [#2]

     {down the bell-pull}. |

Miss Moppet looks worse and worse [#3]. | The Mouse comes a little [#4] nearer. |


Notes
1. Some people will consider "ill" an adverb that explains "how" she looks. Others will consider it to be a predicate adjective. KISS allows the latter explanation in part by explaining this as a palimpsest pattern with "is looking" written over "is." In essence, either explanation is acceptable.
2. Here we have another palimpsest pattern with "comes" written over "is." (When I look for these patterns, I have trouble finding them; I'm making a punctuation exercise and stumble over two of them.)  Alternatively, "sliding" can be explained as a gerundive that modifies "He."
3. Some people will consider "worse" an adverb that explains "how" she looks. Others will consider it to be a predicate adjective. 
4. "Little" is a noun used as an adverb; "bit" is ellipsed. Note that "nearer" is a preposition with its object (her) ellipsed.