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Recognizing Antecedents
From  At the Back of the North Wind
by George Macdonald
Simplified by Elizabeth Lewis; Illustrated by Maria L. Kirk 
Analysis Key

1. {For a fortnight}, Diamond went on driving [#1] his cab (DO) and

helping his family (DO). | Some people began to know him [#2] and 

to look for him [#3] to drive them [#4] [Adv. to "to drive" where they

wanted to go [#5] ]. | One old gentleman [Adj. to "gentleman" who lived 

{near the stables}] hired him (DO) to carry him [#6] {into the city} every 

morning [NuA] {at a certain hour}. |

In the first sentence, the antecedent of "his" and "his" is "Diamond."
In the second sentence, the antecedent of "him" and "him" is "Diamond," and the antecedent of "them" and "they" is "people."
In the third sentence, the antecedent of "who" is "gentleman," the antecedent of the first "him" is "Diamond," and the antecedent of the second "him" is "gentleman."
2. [Adv. to "to came" As Diamond wandered about], he came to stand [#7] 

{by the little door} [Adj. to "door" which opened {upon the lawn} {of the house} 

next door [#8] ]. | That made him remember [#9] [DO how the wind had

driven him (DO) {to this same spot} {on the night} {of his dream}]. |

In the first sentence, the antecedent of "he" is "Diamond," and the antecedent of "which" is "door."
In the second sentence, the antecedent of "That" is the clause that begins with "he" and ends with "door." The antecedent of "him," "him," and "his" is "Diamond."
3. It was a long time (PN) [Adv. to "was" since Diamond had seen North 

Wind (DO) or even thought much {about her}]. | Now [#10] , [Adv. to "to was

thinking" as his father drove along], he was thinking not [#11] {about her} but 

{about the crossing sweeper}. | He was wondering [DO what made him 

feel [#12] [Adv. (condition) to "feel" as if he knew her (DO) quite well] [Adv. 

(condition) to "made" when he could not remember anything (DO) {of her}]].

| But a picture arose {in his mind} {of a little girl} running [#13] {before the wind},

and dragging her broom [#13] {after her}. | {From that}, he recalled the whole 

adventure (DO) {of the night} [Adj. to "night" when he had gone out {with

North Wind} and made her put him [#14] down {in a London street}]. |

In the first sentence, the antecedent of "her" is "North Wind."
In the second sentence, the antecedent of "his" and "he" is "Diamond." The antecedent of "her" is "North Wind."
In the third sentence, the antecedent of "He," "him," "he," and "he" is "Diamond." The antecedent of "her" and "her"  is "North Wind."
In the fourth sentence, the antecedent of "his" is "Diamond," and the antecedent of "her" and "her" is "North Wind."
In the fifth sentence, the antecedent of "that" is "picture," and the antecedent of "he," "he," and "him" is "Diamond." The antecedent of "her" is "North Wind."

Notes
1. "Went on driving" can be explained in a number of ways, one of which is to consider the entire phrase the entire finite verb. This perspective views "went on" as meaning "continued." From the same perspective, "went on" can be seen as the finite verb and "driving" can be seen as a verbal (gerund) that functions as the direct object of "went on." Another view is to see "driving" as a verbal (gerund) that functions as a Noun Used as an Adverb. See KISS Level 4 - Verbals (Gerunds, Gerundives, & Infinitives). The same applies to "helping."
2. "Him" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to know." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "began," but at this KISS Level, I would simply accept "began to know" as the verb phrase. (See KISS Level 2.1.6 - Distinguishing Finite Verbs from Verbals.)
3. "For him" can be explained as an adverbial prepositional phrase to the verbal (infinitive) "to look," or "to look for" can be viewed as a phrasal verb with "him" as its direct object. (See KISS Level 2.1.5 - Phrasal Verbs (Preposition? Or Part of the Verb?) The infinitive phrase functions in the same way that "to know" does.
4. "Them" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to drive." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb of purpose to "to look for."
5. The verbal (infinitive) "to go" functions as the direct object of  "wanted."
6. "Him" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to carry." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb (of purpose) to "hired."
7. The verbal (infinitive) "to stand" functions as an adverb of result to "came." (At this KISS Level, I would simply accept "came to stand" as the finite verb phrase.
8. "Next door" clearly describes the house. The easiest way to explain it is as a Noun Used as an Adverb in an ellipsed adjectival clause -- "...house *which was* next door."
9. "Him" is the subject of the verbal (infinitive) "remember." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "made."
10. Some grammarians will see this "Now" as an adverb; others will consider it an interjection.
11. This "not modifies the following prepositional phrase.
12. "Him" is the subject of the verbal (infinitive) "feel." This infinitive phrase is the direct object of "made."
13. "Running" and "dragging" are verbals (gerundives) that modify "girl." When they get to KISS Level 5.8 - Noun Absolutes, many students will probably prefer to see "girl running . . . and dragging" as a noun absolute that functions as the object of the preposition "of." "Broom" is the direct object of "dragging."
14. "Her" is the subject and "him" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "put." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "made."