The Printable KISS Grammar Workbooks The KISS Literature Anthology
(Code and Color Key)

The Subjunctive Mood
from At the Back of the North Wind
by George Macdonald
Simplified by Elizabeth Lewis; Illustrated by Maria L. Kirk 
Analysis Key

     Remember that the primary reason for exploring the subjunctive mood at this KISS Level is to explain why S/V patterns like "she were" are not subject/verb agreement errors. One way to simplify this exercise is to ask students simply to identify the verb in each sentence that is in the subjunctive -- and then tell why they think it is in the subjunctive.

1. "You are as good (PA) {to your mother} [Adv. to the previous "as" as if 

you were a girl (PN) -- nursing the baby [#1] and toasting the bread [#1]

and sweeping up the hearth [#1] ]." |

2. He decided to see [#2] [DO if Diamond's father would do anything 

(DO) {for any body else}]. | For  [#3] that would be the very best way (PN)

to find out [#4] [DO if it were worth (PA) while [#5] to do anything [#6] 

{for him}]. |

3. Nanny had closed her eyes (DO) [Adv. to "had closed" as if she were 

tired (PA) or asleep]. |

4. What (DO) would my master say [Adv. to "would say" if he were to 

come [#7] back]? |

5. The wind {with its kisses} [#8] makes me feel [#9] [Adv. to "feel" as if I 

were {in North Wind's arms}]. |

6. {At length}, it seemed [Adv. to "seemed" as if he were borne (P) up {on

the air} and could almost fly]. |

7. But presently, he felt [Adv. to "felt" as if he were going {to sleep} [#10] ]  |

and [#11] that would be to lose so much [#12] [Adv. to "so" that he was not 

willing to do it [#13] ]. |

8. [Adv. to "not" If I were only a dream (PN)], you would not have been 

able (PA) to love me [#14] so. |

9. Well [Inj] , [Adv. to "would wish" if I were *going* [#15] to turn {to an 

ugly shape again},] would you still wish [DO I were not a dream (PN)]? |

10. It's [Adv. to "is" as if it were dead (PA)]! |


Notes
1. "Baby" is the direct object of "nursing." "Bread" is the direct object of "toasting," and "hearth" is the direct object of "sweeping." "Nursing," "toasting," and "sweeping" can be explained in either of two ways. They can be described as verbals (gerundives) that modify "girl" (or the subject "you"). Or they can be considered as verbals (gerunds) that function as nouns used as adverbs. See KISS Level Four - Verbals.
2. The verbal (infinitive) "to see" functions as the direct object of "decided."
3. See KISS Level 3.2.2 - "So" and "For" as Conjunctions.
4. The verbal (infinitive) "to find out" ("discover") functions as an adjective to "way."
5. "While" is a noun that functions as an adverb to "worth" -- worth how much? Note that the phrase refers to time, not money.
6. "Anything" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to do." This infinitive phrase functions as a delayed subject -- if to do anything for him were worth while. See KISS Level 5.6 - Delayed Subjects and Sentences.
7. This is a tricky one that you will probably not find in grammar textbooks. KISS explains similar constructions as either ellipsed active voice -- he were *going* to come" or as ellipsed passives -- he were *expected* to come back. See Exercise 10 - "To be to" -  Ellipsed Passive plus an Infinitive? in KISS Level 5.7 - Passive Voice and Retained Complements. The problem here is that the tense doesn't work. So here we have to assume a different ellipsis -- "If he were to *have* come back."
8. Alternatively, "with its kisses" can be described as adverbial to "made."
9. "Me" is the subject of the verbal (infinitive) "feel." The infinitive phrase is the direct object of "makes."
10. Grammarians will have several explanations of "to sleep." First "is going to" is often considered (as it is in KISS) a helping verb. Thus "were going to sleep" could be considered the finite verb phrase. Alternatively, "to sleep" could be considered a verbal (infinitive) that functions as an adverb to "were going." Both of these explanations emphasize "sleep" as a verb. The infinitive explanation suggests that "to sleep" is the purpose of the going. I've opted for a third alternative, "to sleep" as a prepositional phrase. This perspective emphasizes "sleep" as a noun, a state of being that the context suggests as not desirable.
11. Does this "and" join two main clauses (as I have marked it), or does it join the following "that" clause and the preceding "as if" clause (thereby making the "that" clause subordinate? Either explanation can be supported.
12. Either we consider "so" as an adjective and "much" as a pronoun, or we can consider "much" as an adjective and "so" as an adverb. The latter implies an ellipsed "stuff" as the noun that functions as the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to lose." The infinitive phrase functions as a predicate noun after "would be."
13. "It" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to do." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb to "willing," which can be considered either part of the finite verb or as a verbal (gerundive) that functions as a predicate adjective.
14. "Me" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to love." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb to "able."
15. See Exercise 10 ("To be to" -  Ellipsed Passive plus an Infinitive?) in KISS Level 5.7 - Passive Voice and Retained Complements.