The KISS Grammar Workbooks Back to Samples

My Kitten

I. Directions:
1. Place parentheses ( ) around each prepositional phrase. 
2. Underline verbs twice, their subjects once, and label complements ("PA," "PN," "IO," or "DO").
3. Draw an arrow from every adjective and adverb to the word it modifies.

     I own a kitten. She is black and white. She sometimes curls up in my lap and

falls asleep. Sometimes when she's asleep and I'm petting her, she has a bad 

dream. She starts squirming, and squirming. She wakes up and runs under my 

bed. She sometimes acts weird, but she is usually very calm. When I pet her, she

purrs very very loud. She is usually nice, but sometimes she bites, and starts 

kicking me. She can get very scared. I usually sit by her in front of the heater. 

She attacks my dog. It's very funny! I like her very much!



II. Do a statistical analysis:
1. Count the total number of words in the selection (TW).
2. Count the total number of sentences in the selection (TS).
3. Count the total number of words that are in prepositional phrases (TWPP).
4. Count the total number of words that you were Unable to Explain (UtE).
5. Divide the total number of words (TW) by the total number of sentences (TS). This will give you the average number of words that you use in a sentence. You can compare that number to the numbers in the statistical exercises that you will do and/or to the average for your class. (Remember, like Goldilocks, you do not want that number to be too hot (high) or too cold (low). The best place to be in somewhere near the middle.)
6. Divide  the total number of words that are in prepositional phrases (TWPP) by the total number of words (TW). You can compare this number to those in the samples and your class average. It will give you an idea of how much you are using prepositional phrases (primarily to add descriptive details of people, things, times and places).
7. Subtract the total number of words that you were Unable to Explain (UtE) from the total number of words in what you wrote (TW). This will give you the approximate number of words (in your own writing) that you can already grammatically explain (NCE). Divide this number by the total number of words  (TW). (This shows approximately  how much of your own writing that you can already explain.)