The Printable KISS Grammar Workbooks To KISS Level 2.2.1
A Mini-Lesson on

"To" and "Too"

     When readers see the word "to," they expect to find a word after it that answers the question "to what?" If that word is a noun or pronoun, the construction is a prepositional phrase:

Peter said it {to Benjamin}.
Benjamin gave it {to him}.

If the word is not a noun or pronoun, the construction is an infinitive. You will study infinitives later, so you do not need to remember the term now. All you need to remember is that the construction is not a prepositional phrase:

Benjamin wanted to bring onions to his mother.

     When readers see the word "too," they do not expect to find a word after it that answers the question "What?" "Too" basically has two meanings. First, it can mean "also":

Peter ate onions too.

Second, it is used for comparison:

The lettuce was too old.

In the preceding sentence, the "too" compares the lettuce to what the writer considers to be the norm for freshness of lettuce.

     Because "to" raises expectations of "what?" in readers, and "too" does not, misspelling "to" or "too" distracts most readers. That is why it is so often noted as an error.