The KISS Grammar Workbooks Return to: The Child's World: Third Reader
(Code and Color Key)

Rewriting Adverbial Clauses as Main and Main as Adverbial

From "The Three Tasks"
-- Grimm
Analysis Key

A. Rewriting Adverbial Clauses as Main Clauses


There are, of course, various ways by which adverbial clauses can be rewritten as main. Thus this key gives only some examples.

Directions: Rewrite each sentence by changing an adverbial subordinate clause into a main clause. (You can do this by creating two main clauses or by creating compound finite verbs in one main clause.)

1. One day [NuA] [Adv. to "found" as he was passing {through a village} far away {from home}], he found his two brothers (DO). | [18 w/mc; focus is on "found" with a logical connection of time]

Separate Sentences: One day he was passing through a village far away from home. | There he found his two brothers. | [9 w/mc]
Compound Sentence: One day he was passing through a village far away from home, | and there he found his two brothers. | [9.5 w/mc]
Compound Finite Verbs: One day he was passing through a village far away from home and found his two brothers. | [17 w/mc]
2. [Adv. to "saw" As they journeyed on,] they saw a large ant hill (DO) {by the side} {of the road}. | [16 w/mc; focus is on "saw" with a logical connection of time]
Compound Sentence: They journeyed on, | and they saw a large ant hill by the side of the road. |  [8 w/mc]
Compound Finite Verbs: They journeyed on  and saw a large ant hill by the side of the road. |  [15 w/mc]
3. [Adv. to "gave" When the eldest brother had read this (DO)], the old man gave him (IO) the first tablet (DO). | [15 w/mc; focus is on "gave" with a logical connection of time]
Compound Sentence: The eldest brother read this, | and then the old man gave him the first tablet. | [7.5 w/mc]
4. [Adv. to "ate" Before they went to sleep [#1],] the eldest ate sugar (DO), | the second ate syrup (DO), | and the youngest ate honey (DO). | [6 w/mc; focus is on "gave" with a logical connection of time]
Separate Sentences:  The eldest ate sugar. | The second ate syrup. | And the youngest ate honey. | Then they went to sleep. | [4.5 w/mc]
Compound Sentence:  The eldest ate sugar, | the second ate syrup, | and the youngest ate honey | -- then they went to sleep. | [4.5 w/mc]
5. [Adv. to "came" As he sat there,] the king {of the ants} came {with five thousand ants}. | [14 w/mc; focus is on "came" with a logical connection of time]
Separate Sentences: He sat there. | Meanwhile the king of the ants came with five thousand ants. | [7 w/mc]



B. Rewriting Main Clauses as Adverbial

Directions: Rewrite each sentence by changing a main clause into an adverbial subordinate clause.

1. The two brothers had been gone some time [NuA]. | Then their younger brother set out to seek his fortune [#2]. | [9 w/mc]

[After the two brothers had been gone some time], their younger brother set out to seek his fortune. | [18 w/mc; focus is on "set out" with a logical connection of time]

The two brothers had been gone some time [before their younger brother set out to seek his fortune]. | [18 w/mc; focus is on "had been gone" with a logical connection of time]

[Because the two brothers had been gone some time], their younger brother set out to seek his fortune. | [18 w/mc; focus is on "set out" with a logical C/E connection of cause]

2. They went {on their way}, | and they came {to a pond}. | [5.5 w/mc]
[As they went on their way], they came to a pond. | [11 w/mc; focus is on "came" with a logical connection of time]

They went on their way [until they came to a pond]. | [11 w/mc; focus is on "went" with a logical connection of time]

3. They wasted their time (DO) and their money (DO) {in all sorts} {of foolish ways}, | and {before long} they were nearly penniless (PA). | [10 w/mc]
[Because they wasted their time and their money in all sorts of foolish ways], before long they were nearly penniless. | [20 w/mc; focus is on "were" with a logical C/E connection of cause]

They wasted their time and their money in all sorts of foolish ways, [so before long they were nearly penniless]. | [20 w/mc; focus is on "wasted" with a logical C/E connection of result]

4. The eldest brother searched the whole day [NuA] long, | but {by sunset} he had found only a hundred pearls (DO). | [9 w/mc]
[After the eldest brother searched the whole day long,] by sunset he had found only a hundred pearls. | [18 w/mc; focus is on "had found" with a logical connection of time]

[Although the eldest brother searched the whole day long,] by sunset he had found only a hundred pearls. | [18 w/mc; focus is on "had found" with a logical connection of concession]

5.  The two older brothers were about to kill the ducks [#3], | but the simpleton said, " [DO *You* Leave them (DO) alone]. | [#4] I will not let you kill them [#5]." | [8 w/mc]
[While the two older brothers were about to kill the ducks,] the simpleton said, [DO "Leave them alone]. | I will not let you kill them."  | [12 w/mc; focus is on "said" with a logical connection of time]

The two older brothers were about to kill the ducks, [when the simpleton said, [DO "Leave them alone]]. | I will not let you kill them." | [12 w/mc; focus is on "were about to kill" with a logical connection of time]

[Because the two older brothers were about to kill the ducks,] the simpleton said, [DO "Leave them alone]. | I will not let you kill them."  | [12 w/mc; focus is on "said" with a logical connection of cause]


Notes
1. If one considers "sleep" to be a noun here, "to sleep" is a prepositional phrase; if one considers it to be a verb, then "to sleep" is an infinitive. Either way, it functions as an adverb to "went." Note that this subordinate clause carries across the main clause boundaries to modify each "ate."
2. "Fortune" is the direct object of the infinitive "to seek." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb (of purpose) to "set out."
3. "Ducks" is the direct object of the infinitive "to kill." The infinitive phrase can be described as the object of the preposition "about," and the prepositional phrase as either a predicate adjective or as an adverb to "were." Alternatively, "about" can been seen as the equivalent of "ready," which would make it the predicate adjective and the infinitive phrase an adverb that modifies it. [You won't find this construction explained in most grammar textbooks.]
4. Although the entire quotation could be considered the direct object of "said," KISS ends the main clause here. For more on this see KISS Level 3.2.3 - Interjection? Or Direct Object?
5. "Them" is the direct object, and "you" is the subject of the infinitive "kill." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "let."