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(Code and Color Key)

Bending and Breaking the Rules
From  My Book of Favorite Fairy Tales
Analysis Key

 
1. But the young wife heeded nothing (DO) [Adj. to "nothing" they said or 

did], | all [Adj. to "all" she thought of] was that little key (PN) [Adj. to "key"

which she must not use]. |

The comma-splice after "did" was probably used because the two main clauses indicate what she did and did not heed. Some writers would have used a semicolon.
2. It was {by no means} likely (PA) [ [#1] that he would forget it (DO) ], |

{in fact} he could think {of nothing else}. |

The second main clause restates (amplifies) the first. Some writers would have used a dash or colon here.
3. {In fact}, [Adv. (condition) to "should be"  [#2] should you open that door 

(DO), or even put this key (DO) {into the lock}], I should be dreadfully

angry (PA), | indeed I should make you suffer [#3] {for it} {in a terrible way}. |

The second main clause restates (amplifies) the first. Some writers would have used a dash or colon here.
4. The King smiled, | and ?he? himself went to open the rock [#4]. |
Note the unusual use of "himself" as the subject of the second main clause. If we take "himself" out, we get a compounded finite verb in a single clause. It is as if an appositive ("himself") works its way into the sentence to emphasize the second verb.
5. {In spite} {of the dwarf's bad temper}, the girls took all possible pains (DO) to 

release the little man [#5], but [#6] {without avail}; | the beard could not be

moved (P), | it was wedged (P) too tightly. |

The comma after "moved" creates a technical comma-splice. Few colons or dashes are used in this book, which may help explain why the writer did not use a dash, as some writers would have. Note that the "it" clause can be seen as stating the cause of the clause before it. 
6. [Adv. to "found" When the merchant arrived {at the city}], {to his dismay} he

found [DO that the man [Adj. to "man" who owed him (IO) the money (DO)]

was still unable (PA) to pay him [#7] ], | the man had been disappointed (P) 

himself [#8] {at the last moment}. |

The comma after "him" creates a somma-splice. As in #5, the final main clause states the cause of what is explained in the preceding clause.

Notes
1. This clause functions as a delayed subject -- "That he would forget it was by no means likely." See KISS Level 5.6 - Delayed Subjects.
2. This is a relatively rare construction in which the subordinate conjunction ("if") is implied.
3. "You" is the subject of the infinitive "suffer." The infinitive phrase is the direct object of "should make."
4. "Rock" is the direct object of the infinitive "to open." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb (of purpose) to "went."
5.  "Man" is the direct object of the infinitive "to release." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb (of purpose) to "took."
6.  We can explain this "but" as a coordinating conjunction to an ellipsed clause "but *they did so* with no avail."
7. "Him" is the indirect object of the infinitive "to pay." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb to "unable."
8. "Himself" is an appositive to "man."