The Printable KISS Workbooks KISS Workbooks Anthology
(Code and Color Key)

Gerunds as Objects of Prepositions
Ex # 1 based on Black Beauty, by Anna Sewell
Analysis Key

1. {On returning} {to the cab} our friend was joined (P) {by his companion}. |
 

2. I'll have you arrested [#1] {for leaving your horses [#2] }, and {for brutal conduct}. |
 

3. You do beat all (DO) [Adj. to "all" I ever saw] {for being quick and 

thorough [#3] } {at the same time}. |
 

4. I should be glad (PA) to make some arrangements [#4] {with you} {for taking

Mrs. Briggs [#5] regularly {to church} {on Sunday mornings} }. |
 

5. This gentleman took a great liking (DO) {to me}, | and {after trying me [#6] 

several times [NuA] {with the saddle} }, he prevailed {upon my master} to sell me [#7]

{to a friend} {of his}, [Adj. to "friend" who wanted a safe, pleasant horse (DO) {for

riding} [#8]. ] |
 

6. He was very fond (PA) {of making little songs, and singing them [#9] {to himself} }. |


Notes
1. "You arrested" can be explained in two ways. For one, it can be considered an ellipsed infinitive construction -- "you *to be* arrested." In this version, "you" is the subject and "arrested" is either part of the infinitive or a gerundive that functions as a predicate adjective after it. The infinite phrase functions as the direct object of "will have." The other option is to consider "you arrested" as a noun absolute construction that functions as the direct object of "will have."
2. "Horses" is the direct object of the gerund "leaving." The gerund phrase functions as the object of the preposition.
3. "Quick" and "thorough" are predicate adjectives after the gerund "being." The gerund phrase functions as the object of the preposition.
4. "Arrangements" is the direct object of the infinitive "to make." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb to "glad."
5.  "Mrs. Briggs" is the direct object of the gerund "taking," which functions as the object of the preposition. The "for" phrase can be explained as an adjective to "arrangements" and/or as an adverb (of purpose) to "to make."
6. "Me" is the direct object of "trying."
7.  "Me" is the direct object of the infinitive "to sell" which can be explained as an adverb (of manner) to "prevailed." Alternatively, "prevailed upon" can be explained as a phrasal verb that means "convinced." This would make "master" the subject of the infinitive "to sell" and the infinitive phrase the direct object of "prevailed upon."
8. The "for riding" phrase can be seen as an adjective to "horse" and/or as an adverb (of purpose) to "wanted."
9. "Songs" is the direct object of "making," and "them" is the direct object of "singing."