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Gerunds as Objects of Prepositions
Ex # 2 based on Black Beauty, by Anna Sewell
Analysis Key

1. I shall expect them to answer [#1] {for my soul}, [Adv. to "shall expect" if I 

can't get a chance (DO) {of saving it [#2] }]. |
 

2. He seemed furious (PA) {at their having moved}, and {with whip and rein} 

punished them (DO) brutally. |
 

3. The longer [#3] [Adj. to "longer" *that* I lived {at Birtwick}], the more [#3] 

proud (PA) and happy (PA) I felt {at having such a place [#4] }. |
 

4. {After giving us a slight look [#5] } he called a groom to take us [#6] {to 

our boxes}, and invited John to take some refreshment [#6]. |
 

5. He was quite too short (PA) to do anything [#7] {in the way} {of grooming

Ginger and me [#8] }|
 

6. He had still a proud way (DO) {of holding his head and arching his neck [#9] }. |


Notes
1. "Them" is the subject of the infinitive "to answer." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "shall expect."
2. "It" is the direct object of the gerund "saving."
3. "The" before "longer" makes it a noun. That we could have a "that" before "I lived" suggests that this clause functions as an adjective to "longer." "The longer" functions as a noun used as an adverb (of cause) to "the more," which similarly functions as an adverb to "proud" and "happy." This construction is idiomatic, and, in this case, reversible -- "The longer I lived at Bertwick, the more proud and happy *that* I felt at having such a place." Indeed, many native speakers would accept this construction with two implicit subordinate clauses and no main clause --  "The longer [*that* I lived at Bertwick], the more [*that* I felt proud and happy at having such a place.]" From this perspective, we might want to say that "the longer" and "the more" function as coordinating conjunctions, similar to "Not only ... but also..." and "Neither ... nor ...."
4. "Place" is the direct object of the gerund "having."
5. "Look" is the direct object, and "us" is the indirect object of the verbal (gerund) "giving." The gerund phrase functions as the object of the preposition "After."
6. The two infinitive phrases in this sentence could probably evoke a great deal of discussion (and thus disagreement) from grammarians. In the first one, "us" is the direct object of the infinitive "to take." The questionable part is the function of the infinitive. Personally, I see it as adverbial to "called" because it states why he called the groom. Thus I'd say that "groom" alone is the direct object. I could, however, easily see how other people would consider "groom" to be the subject of the infinitive. From this perspective, the entire infinitive phrase would be the direct object of "called." If one interprets "called" as being essentially the same as "asked," then this perspective makes sense. KISS principle of alternative explanations thus would allow either perspective.
     The second infinitive phrase is similar. There would be no argument that "refreshment" is the direct object of "to take." In this case, however, I personally lean toward "John" as the subject of the infinitive and the infinitive phrase as the direct object of "invited" -- which is meaningfully much closer to "asked" than "called" is. I would, however, readily accept the explanation that "John" by itself is the direct object and that "to take some refreshment" functions as an adverb to "invited."
7. "Anything" is the direct object of the verbal (infinitive) "to do." The infinitive phrase functions as an adverb to "too" which, in turn, modifies "short."
8. "Ginger" and "me" are direct objects of the verbal (gerund) "grooming" which functions as the object of the preposition "of."
9. "Head" is the direct object of "holding" which is a gerund that is one of the two objects of the preposition "of." "Neck" is the direct object of "arching," a gerund that is the other object of the preposition "of."