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Mixed Subordinate Clauses
From Alice in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll
Analysis Key

1.  Dinah [DirA], my dear [#1], I wish [DO you were down here {with me}]! |

2. Now I'm opening out {like the largest telescope} [Adj. to "telescope" 

     that ever was]! |

3. [Subj. of "is" What [#2] I was going to say], is [PN that the best thing 

     to get us dry [#3] would be a Caucus-race (PN)]. |

4. She had put on one (DO) {of the Rabbit's little white kid-gloves} [Adv.

     to "had put" while she was talking]. |

5. Everything is so out-of-the-way (PA) down here [Adv. (result) to

     "so" that I should think very likely [#4]  [DO the mouse can talk]]. |

6. Once or twice she had peeped {into the book} [Adj. to "book" her sister 

     was reading], | but it had no pictures (DO) or conversations (DO) {in it}. |

7. Her first idea was [PN that she had somehow fallen {into the sea}]. |

8. She knelt down and looked {along the passage} {into the loveliest 

      garden}  [Adj. to "garden" you ever saw]. |

9. She found herself (DO) falling [#5] {down [OP what seemed to be 

     a very deep well (PN) ] }. |

10. But [Adv. to "started" when the Rabbit actually took a watch (DO) 

      {out of its waistcoat-pocket} and looked {at it} and then hurried on]

     Alice started {to her feet}. |

11. The question is, [PN what [#6] did the archbishop find?] |


Notes
1. "Dear" can be described either as and appositive to the preceding "Dinah," which functions as a Direct Address, or it itself can be considered as another Direct Address. [For appositives, see KISS Level 5.4.]
2. Note how this "What" functions simultaneously as a subordinating conjunction and as the direct object of "was going to say."
3. "Us" is the subject and "dry" is a predicate adjective to an ellipsed infinitive -- "us *to be* dry." This infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of the infinitive "to get." The entire "to get" phrase functions as an adjective to "thing." See infinitives in KISS Level 4.
4. A better, but more complex way to explain this part of the sentences is to use ellipsis -- "I should think [DO *it is* very likely [Delayed  Subj.the mouse can talk]]." This makes the "it is" clause the direct object of "should think" and the "the mouse can talk" a delayed subject to the "it" -- "that the mouse can talk is very likely." "Likely" then functions as a predicate adjective. See KISS Level 5.6 - Delayed Subjects and Sentences.
5. "Falling" can be explained as a gerundive that modifies "herself." However, at KISS Level 5.8 Noun Absolutes, some people will prefer to see "herself falling" as a noun absolute that functions as the direct object of "found." (She did not find "herself"; she found "herself falling.") For more on this, see KISS Level 5.8. "OP" stands for "Object of a Preposition," which is how the following clause functions.
6. See note # 2.