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An Exercise in Punctuation
Two Selections from Alice in Wonderland
by Lewis Carroll

The original text is:

    Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time, as she went down, to look about her. First, she tried to make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves; here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed. It was labeled "ORANGE MARMALADE," but, to her great disappointment, it was empty; she did not like to drop the jar, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.


     She waited for some time without hearing anything more. At last came a rumbling of little cart-wheels and the sound of a good many voices all talking together. She made out the words: "Where's the other ladder? Bill's got the other -- Bill! Here, Bill! Will the roof bear? -- Who's to go down the chimney? -- Nay, I sha'n't! You do it! Here, Bill! The master says you've got to go down the chimney!"

Analysis Key (FYI)
 
    Either the well was very deep (PA), | or she fell very slowly, [Adv. to

"was" and "fell" for [#1] she had plenty (DO) {of time}, [Adv. to "had" as 

she went down], to look [#2] {about her}]. | First, she tried to make out [#3]

[DO what [#4] she was coming {to} ], | but it was too dark (PA) to see 

anything [#5] ; [*] | then she looked {at the sides} {of the well} and noticed 

[DO that they were filled (P) {with cupboards and book-shelves}]; [*] | here 

and there she saw maps (DO) and pictures (DO) hung [#6] {upon pegs}. | 

She took down a jar (DO) {from one} {of the shelves} [Adv. to "took" as she

passed]. | It was labeled (P) "ORANGE MARMALADE," [#7] | but, {to her 

great disappointment}, it was empty (PA); [*] | she did not like to drop the 

jar [#8], [Adv. (result) to "not" so [#9] she managed to put it [#10] {into one} 

{of the cupboards} [Adv. (time) to "managed" as she fell {past it} ]]. |



 
     She waited {for some time} {without hearing anything [#11] more}. | {At

last} came a rumbling {of little cart-wheels} and the sound {of a good many 

voices} all talking [#12] together. | She made out the words (DO) : [#13] | 

"Where's the other ladder? | Bill's got the other *ladder* (DO) | -- [#14]

Bill! [DirA] *You Come* Here, Bill [DirA] ! | Will the roof bear? | --

Who's to go [#15] {down the chimney}? | -- Nay, I sha'n't! | You do 

it (DO)! | Here, Bill [DirA] ! The master says [DO you've got to go {down

the chimney}]!" |


Notes
1. Note how this clause crosses the preceding main-clause break and also modifies "was." For more on this "for," see KISS Level 3.2.2 - "So" and "For" as Conjunctions.
2. The infinitive "to look" functions as an adjective to "plenty" and/or "time."
3. The infinitive "to make out " (to discern, or see) functions as the direct object of "tried." 
4. "What" functions simultaneously as the subordinating conjunction and the object of the preposition "to."
5. "Anything" is the direct object of the infinitive "to see." The infinitive functions as an adverb (of result) to "too."
6. "Hung" is a gerundive that modifies "pictures." It may, or may not, also cross the "and" and modify "maps." In other words, whether or not maps were also hung upon pegs is not clear.
7. "ORANGE MARMALADE" is a retained predicate noun after the passive "was labeled." See KISS Level 5.7 - Passive Voice and Retained Complements.
8. "Jar" is the direct object of the infinitive "to drop." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "did like."
9. "So" and "for" can be either coordinating or subordinating conjunctions. See: KISS Level 3.2.2 - "So" and "For" as Conjunctions.
10. "It" is the direct object of the infinitive "to put." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "managed."
11. "Anything" is the direct object of the gerund "hearing." The gerund phrase functions as the object of "without." "More" can be explained in at least two ways. It could be considered an appositive to "anything." (Note that it could read "without hearing more," which would make "more" the direct object of "hearing.") It can also be considered a simple adjective that typically appears after what it modifies (as in "they all went").
12. "All" is an appositive to "voices," and "talking" is a gerundive that modifies "all."
13. Note the colon that indicates that a list of words will follow.
14. The use of dashes in this section is not clear. It does not separate voices because the two preceding main clauses (not separated by a dash) are clearly two distinct voices (question and answer). They may be intended to indicate short lapses of time between statements.
15. This could mean "who is going to go" or "who is supposed to go." For more on it, see Exercise # 10 ("To be to" -  Ellipsed Passive plus an Infinitive?) in KISS Level 5.7 - Passive Voice and Retained Complements.

* Notes on the Semicolons

     Throughout Alice in Wonderland, Carroll rarely uses semicolons to separate main clauses with contrasting ideas. He does, however, frequently use them to both set off and join main clauses that present sequences of related ideas. All the semicolons in this selection could be replaced by periods, but doing so would disconnect relationships that, with the semicolons, remain connected in one sentence. Two semicolons hold together the second sentence which is basically about "seeing" and the results thereof:
First, she tried to make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves; here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs.
The third sentence describes a physical action that selects a jar from what she is seeing:
She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed.
The next sentence, the last in the selection, is all about the jar, and like the second sentence, it is held together with a semicolon:
It was labeled "ORANGE MARMALADE," but, to her great disappointment, it was empty; she did not like to drop the jar, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.
In both sentences, within the framework of the semicolons, Carroll first used ", but" to establish a contrast between two main clauses. In the second sentence, it is between effort ("tried to make out") and the reason for failure ("too dark"). In the fourth, it is between implied HAPPY expectations ("ORANGE MARMALADE") and "disappointment."
     After the first semicolon in both sentences, Carroll uses either compound verbs or two clauses to present further distinct logical perspectives. In the second sentence, compound finite verbs move from general ("looked at the sides of the wall") to the more specific ("noticed . . . cupboards and book-shelves"). In the fourth sentence, the movement is from feeling ("did not like to drop the jar") to the adverbial "so" clause of result.
     Those people who want to do away with the semicolon (and there are many such) simply do not see how effectively semicolons can both group and distinguish ideas -- all within one sentence.