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Decombining and Combining Sentences--Finite Verbs
From Alice in Wonderland
by Lewis Carroll

     This should be an easy exercise, but remember that its purpose is primarily to remind students that sentences can be restructured to change their focus and effect. It should also prepare students for combining and de-combining exercises that are much more complicated.
     I have included the number of words per main clause for each version. Typically, we want younger students to do more combining than de-combining, but both Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky, the two pioneers in the study of cognitive development, have argued that mastery of a concept entails the ability to reverse it.

Part 1: Decombining Sentences with Finite Verbs

1. So [#1] she set {to work} [#2] and very soon finished off the cake (DO). | [12 w/mc]

So she set to work. | Very soon she finished off the cake. | [6 w/mc]
2. She was now about [#3] two feet [NuA] high (PA) and was going on shrinking [#4] rapidly. | [13 w/mc]
She was now about two feet high. | She was going on shrinking rapidly. | [6.5 w/mc]
3. {After a time}, she heard a little pattering (DO) {of feet} {in the distance} and hastily dried her eyes (DO) to see [#5] [DO what was coming]. | [23 w/mc]
After a time, she heard a little pattering of feet in the distance. | She hastily dried her eyes to see what was coming. | [11.5 w/mc]
4. The rabbit-hole went straight on {like a tunnel} {for some way} and then dipped suddenly down. | [16 w/mc]
The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way. | Then it dipped suddenly down. | [8 w/mc]
5. {In a very short time}, the Queen was {in a furious passion} and went stamping [#6] about and shouting [#6], "Off with his head!" (DO) or "Off with her head!" (DO) about once {in a minute}. | [32 w/mc]
In a very short time, the Queen was in a furious passion. | She went stamping about, | and she was shouting, "Off with his head!" or "Off with her head!" about once in a minute. | [11.3 w/mc]

Part 2 - Combining Sentences with Finite Verbs

1. {At this}, Alice got up. | And she walked off. | [4.5 w/mc]

At this, Alice got up and walked off. | [8 w/mc]
2. She caught the flamingo (DO). | She tucked it (DO) away {under her arm}, [Adv. (purpose) to "tucked" that it might not escape again]. | [8.5 w/mc]
She caught the flamingo and tucked it away under her arm, that it might not escape again. | [17 w/mc]
3. The White Rabbit blew three blasts (DO) {on the trumpet}. | He called out, "First witness!" (DO) | [7 w/mc]
The White Rabbit blew three blasts on the trumpet and called out, "First witness!" | [14 w/mc]
4. {At this}, the whole pack rose up {in the air}. | They came flying [#7] down {upon her}. | [8 w/mc]
At this, the whole pack rose up in the air and came flying down upon her. | [16 w/mc]
5. The Rabbit actually took a watch (DO) {out of its waistcoat-pocket}. | It looked {at it}. | And then it hurried on. | [6.3 w/mc]
The Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket and looked at it and then hurried on. | [18 w/mc]

Notes
1. See KISS Level 3.2.2 - "So" and "For" as Conjunctions.
2. Although "to work" can be explained here as a prepositional phrase, "work" is also a verb, so I would not argue with people who see "to work" as an adverbial infinitive.
3. This "about" means "approximately" and thus is not a preposition. Note that it can be taken out of the sentence without changing anything else--thus it does not have an object.
4. Grammarians will probably have a variety of views about what is, and what is not, part of this verb phrase. Ultimately, their debate is just about different definitions. In other words, it does not make any difference to students' understanding of sentence structure (except to confuse them).
5. The verbal (infinitive) "to see" functions as an adverb of purpose. The following subordinate clause is its direct object.
6. At this point in their work, students can consider "went stamping" and "shouting" as the finite verb phrase. (KISS would consider it a palimpsest pattern (See Level 2.1.4) with "went" written over "was." In KISS Level 4, students will learn that "stamping" and "shouting" can alternatively be explained as verbals (gerunds) that function as Nouns Used as an Adverbs.
7. See note six.