The Printable KISS Grammar Workbooks The KISS Workbooks Anthology
(Code and Color Key)

Subordinate Clauses as Tag Questions
Based on Heidi by Johanna Spyri
Analysis Key

1. "*You* Don't let her get cold [#1], [ [Tag] do you hear?]" |

2. "She must come {to school} next winter [NuA] ; [#2] [ [Tag] [#3] *you

     remember that (DO)]." |

3. You can hear the fir-trees roar [#4] here, [ [Tag] can't you?] |

4. You tried very hard to conceal it [#5], [ [Tag] did you not?] |

5. "You would like to know [#6], [ [Tag] wouldn't you, Heidi [DirA] ?]" |

6. I want the goats to give me splendid milk [#7], [ [Tag] *you* remember]. |

7. "You can find a way (DO) {for her to stay [#8] }, grandfather [DirA],

[ [Tag] can't you?]" |

8. "You are not afraid (PA), [ [Tag] I hope?]" [ [#9] said the doctor, getting

up [#10] ]. |

9. "No. *You* Please send them (DO) {to Clara}; | she will like them

(DO), [ [Tag] I am sure (PA)]." |

10. "[Adv. to "must be" If we hope {for an improvement} {in her condition}]

we must be extremely cautious (PA) and careful (PA), [ [Tag] *you*

remember that (DO)!]" |


Notes
1. "Cold" is a predicate adjective after the infinitive "get" (which means "become"). "Her" is the subject of the infinitive, and the infinitive is the direct object of "don't let."
2. Because of the semicolon, we could alternatively consider this as two main clauses.
3. Note how tag questions slide into the direct object or interjection question which is the subject of KISS Level 3.2.3.
4. "Fir-trees" is the subject of the infinitive "roar." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "can hear." [At first glance "The fir-trees roar here" appears to pass the sentence-test for finite verbs as opposed to verbals, but if we replace "fir-trees" with a pronoun, it would be "them," and "them roar here" does not pass the sentence test.
5. "It" is the direct object of the infinitive "to conceal." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "tried."
6. The infinitive "to know" functions as the direct object of "would like."
7.  "Me" is the indirect and "milk" the direct object of the infinitive "to give," the subject of which is "goats." The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "want."
8. "Her" is the subject of the infinitive "to stay." The infinitive phrase functions as the object of the preposition.
9. One can, if one wishes, explain the quotation as the direct object of said, or one can see the quotation as the main clause and from "said" to the end as a subordinate clause that functions as an interjection. See KISS Level 3.2.3 - Interjection? Or Direct Object?
10. "Up" can be explained either as an adverb to "getting" or as a phrasal verb (meaning "rising." "Getting (up)" is a gerundive that modifies "doctor."