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A Focus on Infinitives as Delayed Subjects
from Heidi by Johanna Spyri
Analysis Key

1. It won't take long to learn [DS]. |

To learn won't take long.
2. It is difficult (PA) to understand [DS] him. |
To understand him is difficult.
3. It is impossible (PA) to instill [DS] any knowledge {into this being}. |
To instill any knowledge into this being is impossible.
4. It would take several hours [#1] to have [DS] her carried [#2] up {from Ragatz}. |
To have her carried up from Ragatz would take several hours.
5. It was awfully hard (PA) {for Heidi} to stop [DS] crying [#3] [Adv. [#4] 

     when she had once begun]. |

To stop crying when she had  once begun was awfully hard for Heidi.
or
For Heidi to stop crying when she had  once begun was awfully hard.
6. She told him (IO) [DO that it had not been her intention (PN) to 

     leave [DS] Heidi [#5] {with him} long]. |

She told him that to leave Heidi with him long had not been her intention.
7. The boy thought [DO it was a more useful occupation (PN) to look [DS] 

      {for hazel-rods} { [#6] than to learn to read }], [Adv. [#7] for he always 

     needed the rods (DO)]. |

The boy thought that to look for hazel-rods was a more useful occupation than to learn to read, for he always needed the rods.
8. I cannot say [DO how hard (PA) it is {for me to refuse Clara

       this trip [#8] } [DS] ]. |

I cannot say how hard to refuse Clara this trip is for me.
9. But grandfather [DirA], sometimes I felt [Adv. to "felt" as if I could not 

     bear it (DO) any longer to be away {from you}]! |

But grandfather, sometimes I felt as if I could not bear to be away from you any longer! [This "to be" is not a delayed subject; it is an appositive. We might consider it a delayed  direct object, but the structure should be clear to students because the logic of delaying is the same.]
10. Tinette had not even told the child (IO), [Adv. to "not" for she thought 

     it *to be* [#9] {beneath her dignity} to speak [DS] {to the vulgar Heidi}]. |

Tinette had not even told the child, for she thought that to speak to the vulgar Heidi was beneath her dignity.

Notes
1. "Hours" could be considered a direct object here, but some of us will see it as answering the question "How long?" and thus consider it a Noun Used as an Adverb.
2. "Her carried" is the direct object of the delayed subject "to have." It can be explained as an ellipsed infinitive construction -- "have her *to be* carried." This perspective makes "her" the subject of the infinitive "to be carried." Alternatively, "her carried" can be explained as a noun absolute that functions as the direct object of "to have." See KISS Level 5.8 - Noun Absolutes.
3. "Crying" is a verbal (gerund) that functions as the direct object of "to stop." As the sentences below it suggest, "to stop" can alternatively be explained as the object of the preposition "for." That makes the whole "for" phrase the delayed subject.
4. Some people will see this "when" clause as modifying "to stop"; others will view it as going to "was." Either explanation is acceptable.
5. "Heidi" is the direct object of "to leave."
6. The verbal (infinitive) "to read" is the direct object of the infinitive "to learn." "To learn" functions as the object of the preposition "than," and the "than" phrase chunks to "more." [Some grammarians would argue that "than" here functions as a subordinating conjunction in an ellipsed subordinate clause "than *it was useful* to learn to read." This explanation is also valid.
7. Two equally valid explanations are possible here. I have marked the "for" clause as if it modifies "thought." Others may see it as modifying "was," which would put this clause inside the direct object clause. One could argue that there is a difference in meaning, but the difference is slight.
8. "Clara" is the indirect and "trip" is the direct object of the infinitive "to refuse." For alternative explanations, see Note 7.
9. Perhaps the best and easiest way to explain this is to see "it" as the subject of an ellipsed infinitive "to be." That makes "it" the subject of the infinitive, and the infinitive phrase the direct object of "thought."