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Infinitives as Delayed Subjects
from The Master of Ballantrae by Robert Louis Stevenson
Analysis Key

1. It was impossible (PA) even to have a guess [#1] [Adj. to "guess" {in what 

direction} we were moving]. |

Even to have a guess in what direction we were moving was impossible.
2. It would be easy (PA) to make too much [#2] {of this division}. |
To make too much of this division would be easy.
3. [Adv. to the second "was"  [#3] Weary (PA) as I was {with watching [#4] } and

{*with* distress} {of mind}], it was impossible (PA) {for me} to sleep [#5]. |

Weary as I was with watching and distress of mind, to sleep was impossible for me.
4. {At that very time} he passed the greater portion (DO) {of his days} {in slumber}

[Adj. to "slumber" {from which} it was often difficult (PA) to rouse him [#6] ]. |

At that very time he passed the greater portion of his days in slumber, from which to rouse him was often difficult.
5. It was pretty (PA) to see [#7] the pair returning [#8] full [#9] {of briers}, and

the father as flushed [#10] and sometimes as bemuddied [#10] {as the child} [#11] . |

To see the pair returning full of briers, and the father as flushed and sometimes as bemuddied as the child was pretty. [Note how this version really does not work.]

Notes
1. "Guess" is the direct object of the infinitive "to have." The infinitive phrase functions as a delayed subject. Note that "even" functions as an adverb to the infinitive.
2. "Much" is the direct object of the infinitive "to make." Note that "too" can be considered an adverb here because "much" is fundamentally an adjective, even though it here functions a a noun. The infinitive phrase functions as a delayed subject. I've marked "of this division" as an adverb because I see it as modifying "make."
3. Grammarians will, I'm sure, have a number of different explanations of "Weary." Although the construction is rare, the easiest way to handle it is to consider the subordinate clause as beginning with "Weary."
4. "Watching" is a gerund.
5. The infinitive "to sleep" functions as a delayed subject. Infinitives with subjects often appear in the normal subject position -- "For me to sleep was impossible." In this version, some people prefer to explain "me" as the subject of the infinitive, the infinitive phrase as the object of the preposition "for," and the prepositional phrase as the subject of the verb.
6. "Him" is the direct object of the infinitive "to rouse," which functions as a delayed subject.
7.  The infinitive "to see" and the rest of the sentence (which all chunks to "to see") functions as a delayed subject.
8. "Returning" can be explained as a gerundive that modifies "pair," with "pair" considered as one of the direct objects of "to see." KISS, however, prefers to explain "pair returning" as a noun absolute that functions as a direct object of "to see."
9.  "Full" is a post-positioned adjective to "pair" -- the pair *which was* full of briers returning . . . "
10. "Father ... flushed and ... bemuddied" is comparable to "pair returning."
11. KISS allows students to explain "as the child" as an adverbial prepositional phrase to the preceding "as" and "as." [I don't like the sound of the plural of "as."] Some grammarians may insist that this has to be explained as an ellipsed clause -- "as the child *was flushed and bemuddied*."