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Aesop's "The Hare and the Tortoise"
From Ernest Rhys, ed.
Analysis Key
 I’ve included the original and its analysis key.

The Hare and the Tortoise (AK of Adapted)

     A Hare jeered {at a Tortoise} {for the slowness} {of his pace}. | But the 

Tortoise laughed and said [DO that he would run {against her} and 

beat her (DO) any day [NuA] ]. | “*You* Come on,” (said the Hare), | 

you shall soon see [DO what [#1] my feet are made (P) of].” | They 

agreed to start [#2] {at once}. | The Tortoise jogged along, {without a 

moment’s stopping}, {at his usual steady pace}. | The Hare treated the whole 

matter (DO) very lightly. | She would first take a little nap (DO) (she said), | 

and she should soon overtake the Tortoise (DO). | Meanwhile the Tortoise 

plodded on, | but the Hare overslept and arrived {at the goal} late. | The 

Tortoise had got in {before her}. |

     Slow and steady wins the race (DO). |

Notes

1. This “what” functions both as a subordinating conjunction and as the object of the preposition “of.” Tell the students that they are expected to be confused by it—they haven’t studied it yet. 
2. From first graders, I’d accept “agreed to start” as the verb phrase. Technically, “to start” is a verbal (infinitive) that functions as the direct object of “agreed.”

The Hare and the Tortoise (Original)

From Aesop’s fables: an anthology of the fabulists of all countries. Ernest Rhys, ed. London: J.M. Dent and Sons, Ltd.; New York, E.P. Dutton and Co. 1913 [1936] 23.

     A Hare jeered at a Tortoise for the slowness of his pace. But he laughed and said, that he would run against her and beat her any day she would name. “Come on,” said the Hare, “you shall soon see what my feet are made of.” So it was agreed that they should start at once. The Tortoise went off jogging along, without a moment’s stopping, at his usual steady pace. The Hare, treating the whole matter very lightly, said she would first take a little nap, and that she should soon overtake the Tortoise. Meanwhile the Tortoise plodded on, and the Hare oversleeping herself, arrived at the goal, only to see that the Tortoise had got in before her.
     Slow and steady wins the race.

Rhys, Ernest. Ed. (AK of the original)

     A Hare jeered {at a Tortoise} {for the slowness} {of his pace}. | But he [#1] 

laughed and said, [DO that he would run {against her} and beat her (DO) 

any day [NuA] [Adj. to “day” she would name]]. | “*You* Come on,” [ [#2] 

said the Hare] , |you shall soon see [DO what [#3] my feet are made (P) 

of.]| So it was agreed (P) [ [#4] that they should start {at once}]. | The 

Tortoise went off jogging [#5] along, {without a moment’s stopping}, {at his usual

steady pace}. | The Hare, treating the whole matter [#6] very lightly, said [DO 

she would first take a little nap (DO) ], and [DO that she should soon 

overtake the Tortoise (DO) ]. | Meanwhile the Tortoise plodded on, | and 

the Hare oversleeping herself [#7], arrived {at the goal}, only to see [#8] [DO

that the Tortoise had got in {before her}]. |

     Slow and steady wins the race (DO). |

Notes

O1. Note how easy it is to interpret this “he” as the Hare and not the Tortoise.
O2. KISS considers this “said” clause as an interjection. See Exercise 3 in KISS Level 3.2.3.
O3. This “what” functions both as a subordinating conjunction and as the object of the preposition “of.”
O4. This “that” clause functions as a Delayed Sentence—“That they should start at once was agreed.” See KISS Level 5.6 - Delayed Subjects and Sentences. 
O5. “Jogging” can be explained both as a gerundive that modifies “Tortoise” and/or as a gerund the functions as a Noun Used as an Adverb.
O6. “Matter” is the direct object of the gerundive “treating.” “Treating” modifies “Hare.”
O7. “Herself” is the direct object of the gerundive “oversleeping.” The gerundive phrase modifies “Hare.”
O8. “To see” is an infinitive that functions as an adverb (of result) to “arrived.”