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Fill in the Blanks with Pronouns or Possessive Adjectives
From "The Happy Prince," by Oscar Wilde

The Original Sentences

There are, of course, other pronouns that would be correct. For example, in number six, "It is curious" could be "That is curious."
1. The boy was tossing feverishly on his bed, and the mother had fallen asleep,

she was so tired.
 

2. One night there flew over the city a little Swallow. His friends had gone

away to Egypt six weeks before, but he had stayed behind, for he was in

love with the most beautiful Reed. He had met her early in the spring as

he was flying down the river after a big yellow moth, and had been so

attracted by her slender waist that he had stopped to talk to her.
 

3. "It is curious," he remarked, "but I feel quite warm now, although it is

so cold."
 

4. At noon the yellow lions come down to the water's edge to drink. They 

have eyes like green beryls, and their roar is louder than the roar of the cataract.
 

5.  "Why can't you be like the Happy Prince?" asked a sensible mother of

her little boy who was crying for the moon.
 

6.   "Alas! I have no ruby now," said the Prince; "my eyes are all that I 

have left. They are made of rare sapphires, which were brought out of 

India a thousand years ago. Pluck out one of them and take it to him.

He will sell it to the jeweller, and buy food and firewood, and finish his play."
 

7. So the Swallow plucked out the Prince's eye, and flew away to the

student's garret. It was easy enough to get in, as there was a hole in the

roof. Through this he darted, and came into the room. The young man

had his head buried in his hands, so he did not hear the flutter of the 

bird's wings, and when he looked up he found the beautiful sapphire lying

on the withered violets.
 

8.     Early the next morning the Mayor was walking in the square below

in company with the Town Councillors. As they passed the column he 

looked up at the statue: "Dear me! how shabby the Happy Prince looks!"

he said.

    "How shabby indeed!" cried the Town Councillors, who always agreed

with the Mayor; and they went up to look at it.
 

9.  "Bring me the two most precious things in the city," said God to one

of His Angels; and the Angel brought Him the leaden heart and the dead bird.

    "You have rightly chosen," said God, "for in my garden of Paradise this

little bird shall sing for evermore, and in my city of gold the Happy Prince

shall praise me."


Analysis Key

1. The boy was tossing feverishly {on his bed}, | and the mother had fallen

asleep, | [#1] she was so tired (PA). |
 

2. One night [NuA] there [#2] flew {over the city} a little Swallow. | His friends 

had gone away {to Egypt} six weeks [NuA] before, | but he had stayed 

behind, [Adv. (cause) to "had gone" [#3] for he was {in love} {with the most

beautiful Reed}]. | He had met her (DO) early {in the spring} [Adv. (time) to 

"had met" as he was flying {down the river} {after a big yellow moth},] [#4] and

had been so attracted  (P) {by her slender waist} [Adv. (result) to "so" that he 

had stopped to talk [#5] {to her}]. |
 

3. "It is curious (PA)," [ [#6] he remarked], | "but I feel quite warm (PA)

now, [Adv. (concession) to "feel" although it is so cold (PA)]." |
 

4. {At noon} the yellow lions come down {to the water's edge} to drink [#7] . |

They have eyes (DO) {like green beryls}, | and their roar is louder (PA) 

{than [#8] the roar} {of the cataract}. |
 

5.  "Why can't you be {like the Happy Prince} [#9] ?" [ [#6] asked a sensible 

mother {of her little boy} [Adj. to "boy" who was crying {for the moon}]]. |
 

6.   "Alas! [Inj] I have no ruby (DO) now," [ [#6] said the Prince]; | "my

eyes are all (PN) [Adj. to "all" that I have left [#10] ]. | They are made (P) [#11]

{of rare sapphires}, [Adj. to "sapphires" which were brought (P) {out of India} a

thousand years [NuA] ago. | *You* Pluck out one (DO) {of them} and take 

it (DO) {to him}. | He will sell it (DO) {to the jeweller}, and buy food (DO) 

and firewood (DO), and finish his play (DO)." |
 

7. So [#3] the Swallow plucked out the Prince's eye (DO), and flew away

{to the student's garret}. | It was easy (PA) enough to get [#12] in, [Adv.

(cause) to "easy" as there [#2] was a hole (PN) {in the roof}]. | {Through this}

he darted, and came {into the room}. | The young man had his head buried [#13] 

{in his hands}, [Adv. (result) to "buried" so [#3] he did not hear the flutter (DO) 

{of the bird's wings}], | and [Adv. to "found" when he looked up] he found the

beautiful sapphire lying [#14] {on the withered violets}. |
 

8.     Early the next morning [NuA] the Mayor was walking {in the square} 

below [#15] {in company} {with the Town Councillors}. | [Adv. (time) to "looked

up" As they passed the column (DO) ] he looked up {at the statue}: | "Dear

me! [Inj] how shabby (PA} the Happy Prince looks!" [ [#6] he said]. |

    "How shabby indeed!" (DO) cried the Town Councillors, [Adj. to 

"Town Councillors" who always agreed {with the Mayor}]; | and they went up 

to look [#16] {at it}. |
 

9.  " *You* Bring me (IO) the two most precious things (DO) {in the city},"

[ [#6] said God {to one} {of His Angels}]; | and the Angel brought Him (IO)

the leaden heart (DO) and the dead bird (DO). |

    "You have rightly chosen," [ [#6] said God], "[Adv. (cause) to "rightly" 

for [#3] {in my garden} {of Paradise} this little bird shall sing {for evermore}], |

and {in my city} {of gold} the Happy Prince shall praise me (DO)." |


Notes
1. Technically, this is a comma-splice (two main clauses joined by just a comma). It is, however, a fairly common splice even among professional writers when the second clause can be seen as an adverbial clause of cause.
2. For alternative explanations of this "there," see KISS Level 2.1.3 - Expletives (Optional).
3. See also KISS Level 3.2.2 - "So" and "For" as Conjunctions.
4. I'm assuming that the comma after "moth" signals the end of this clause. Some people, however, may see the following "and" as joining "was flying" and "had been so attracted." That would mean that the "was flying" clause ends at the end of the sentence.
5. The verbal (infinitive) "to talk" functions as an adverb (of purpose) to "had stopped."
6. KISS explains this clause as an interjection. See KISS Level 3.2.3 - Interjection? Or Direct Object?
7. The verbal (infinitive) "to drink" functions as an adverb (of purpose) to "come."
8. Some grammarians prefer to explain this "than" as a subordinate conjunction in an ellipsed subordinate clause -- "than the roar of the cataract *is loud*." Either explanation is acceptable.
9.  Alternatively, "like the Happy Prince" can be explained as a predicate adjective.
10. In subordinate clauses, the direct object of the verb is often simultaneously the subordinating conjunction. (Consider -- "He is the one whom I saw.") The same thing happens here, but it probably happens less frequently with "that" -- I have that left. (Within the clause, of course, "that" replaces "my eyes.") From this perspective, "left" can be explained as a verbal (gerundive) that modifies the direct object "that."
11. "Made" can also be explained as a predicate adjective. See Exercise # 10 in KISS Level 1.2 Adding Complements (PA, PN, IO, DO).
12. The verbal (infinitive) "to get (in)" functions as a delayed subject -- "To get in was easy enough." See KISS Level 5.6 - Delayed Subjects and Sentences.
13. "Buried" can be explained as a verbal (gerundive) that modifies the direct object "head." KISS Level 5.8 - Noun Absolutes offers a more meaningful explanation. He did not have his head. Most people have their heads. What he had was his "head buried (in his hands)." Thus at Level Five KISS suggests that "head buried" is a noun absolute that functions as the direct object of "had."
14. As in note # 13, "sapphire lying" can be explained as a noun absolute that functions as the direct object of "found," or "lying" can be considered a gerundive that modifies the direct object "sapphire." In the case, the latter explanation probably makes more sense, but I would not take the time to argue the point.
15. "Below" is a preposition in an ellipsed phrase that modifies "square" -- "in the square below *the statue.""
16. The verbal (infinitive) "to look" functions as an adverb (of purpose) to "went."