Code and Color Key KISS Grammar Printable Workbooks

Exercise # 1 from
Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter
Analysis Key

A man burdened [#1] {with a secret} should especially avoid the intimacy (DO) 

{of his physician}. | [Adv. to "will ... be dissolved, and flow" If the latter possess [#1

native sagacity (DO), and a nameless something (DO) more [#2] -- [ [#3] *you*

let us call it intuition [#4] ]]; [Adv. to "will ... be dissolved, and flow" if he show [#5]

no intrusive egotism (DO), nor disagreeably prominent characteristics (DO) {of

his own}]; [Adv. to "will ... be dissolved, and flow" if he have [#5] the power (DO),

[Adj. to "power" which must be born (P) {with him}], to bring his mind [#6] {into 

such affinity} {with his patient's *mind*}, [ [#7] that this last shall unawares have

spoken [DO what [#8] he imagines himself only to have thought [#8] ]]];

[Adv. to "will ... be dissolved, and flow" if such revelations be received [#5] (P)

{without tumult}, and acknowledged (P) not so often {by an uttered sympathy} as

{by silence, an inarticulate breath, and here and there a word} to indicate [#9] [DO

that all is understood (P) ]]; [Adv. to "will ... be dissolved, and flow" if {to these

qualifications} {of a confidant} be joined [#5] (P) the advantages afforded [#10

{by his recognized character} {as a physician}] -- then, {at some inevitable moment},

will the soul {of the sufferer} be dissolved (P), and flow forth {in a dark, but

transparent stream}, bringing all its mysteries [#11] {into the daylight}. |


Notes
1.  "Burdened" is a gerundive to "man."
2.  "More" can be explained in a variety of ways, but perhaps the easiest is to see it as the result of an ellipsed clause -- "something *that is* more *than sagacity." From this perspective, "more" would be a pronoun that functions as a predicate noun in the ellipsed clause.
3. If anyone finds an explanation of a clause like this in a textbook, I'd be interesting in what the textbook says about it. Within KISS, it can be considered an interjection.
4. "Intuition" is a predicate noun after the ellipsed infinitive "to be"; "it" is the subject of the infinitive. The infinitive phrase (it *to be* intuition) functions as the direct object of the infinitive "call." "Us" is the subject of "call," and this infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "let."
5. These verbs are in the subjunctive mood.
6. "Mind" is the direct object of the infinitive "to bring." The infinitive phrase functions as an adjective to "power."
7. This adverbial clause of result can be explained as modifying either "to bring" or "have."
8. The "what" functions both as a subordinating conjunction and as the object of the infinitive "to have thought." "Himself" is the subject of the infinitive, and the infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of "imagines" -- "imagines himself to have thought what."
9. The infinitive "to indicate" can be explained as an adverb (How?) to "acknowledged." Alternatively, it can be explained as a retained direct object after the passive "acknowledged." The active voice version would be "someone acknowledged the revelations to indicate [DO that all is understood." In this version, "revelations" is the subject of the infinitive "to indicate" and the entire infinitive phrase is the direct object of "acknowledged."
10. "Afforded" is a gerundive that modifies "advantages." At KISS Level Five, some people may prefer to see "advantages afforded" as a noun absolute that functions as the subject of "be joined."
11. "Mysteries" is the direct object of the gerundive "bringing" which functions as an adjective to "soul."