Grade-Level ToC August 6, 2011
Vincent van Gogh's
(1853-1890)
The Postman 
Joseph Roulin
1888, 
Museum of Fine Arts,
Boston
Carol Gerten's Fine Art
Grade 5, Statistical Stylistics
A KISS Grammar 
Fifth Grade Workbook

Return to the Main Fifth Grade Book

Draft
1. Introduction to Statistical Analysis
1
"Practice with Statistical Analysis"
The Opening of Chapter 2 of Marshall's Robin Hood Data
Sheet
AK Notes ToC
2. Analyzing the Writing of Fifth Graders 
From the Arizona 2001 samples of fifth graders' writing
Have the students read the instructional material for the Arizona 2001 samples of fifth graders' writing
1 Editing for Spelling, Punctuation, and Grammar
Sample # 1
2
Statistical Stylistics - Sample 1  AK
3 Editing for Spelling, Punctuation, and Grammar
Sample # 2
4
Statistical Stylistics - Sample 2  AK
5 Editing for Spelling, Punctuation, and Grammar
Sample # 3
6
Statistical Stylistics - Sample 3 AK
7 Editing for Spelling, Punctuation, and Grammar
Sample # 4
8
Statistical Stylistics - Sample 4  AK
Level 1  - Analyzing My Classmates' and My Writing
[Words per Sentence,  % of Words in Prepositional Phrases,
& % of Words that I Can Explain]

[A set of four samples from Arizona is on the KISS site,
but the analysis keys neet to be updated and the statistics need to be done.]

Click here for the directions for these exercises.
 

The prompt for the fifth graders' writing samples was:
Sample Prompt: Pretend you are a student in Mr. Larkin's fifth grade class, and he has just read a story called "The Big Surprise". The story tells how surprising it can be when something happens that we don't expect. Mr. Larkin asked his students to WRITE A STORY for the class. Here is the assignment:

     Think of a time when something surprised you or someone you know. It could be a big surprise that you will always remember, or a little surprise that no one else noticed. It can be real or imagined.  TELL WHAT HAPPENED.

WRITER'S CHECKLIST

_____ Are my ideas clear?
_____ Does my story have words that make it interesting?
_____ Does my story have a clear beginning, middle, and ending?
_____ Does my writing sound right and make sense?
     Did I edit for...
_____ capital letters?
_____ correct punctuation? 
_____ correct spelling?
If you left any box blank, think about ways to make your story better.
2
Editing for Spelling, Punctuation, and Grammar
by a Fifth Grade Writer AK ToC
3
Statistical Stylistics
by a Fifth Grade Writer AK ToC
4
Editing for Spelling, Punctuation, and Grammar
by a Fifth Grade Writer AK ToC
5
Statistical Stylistics
by a Fifth Grade Writer AK ToC
6
Writing and Analyzing Your Own Response to the Prompt
Statistical Stylistics:
Have the students write their own response to the prompt 
(in pen, double spaced) and then analyze it (with a pencil).

Notes for Teachers

     Collect the results of the students' statistical analysis, average them, and share the average with the class. You might also want to share the average statistics for the five samples from Arizona. (See below.) Remind the class that the idea is to be somewhere near the class average. The biggest numbers do not mean the best writing.

[The statistics for the fifth graders' writing need to be done.]

Q 1
TW
Q 2
TS
Q 3
TWPP
Q 4
UtE
Q 5
TW
/ TS
W/MC Q 6
TWPP
/ TW
Q 7
Can
Explain
S01
Avg
3. Analyzing My Own Writing
This project should be spread across two to four weeks.
1 Have the students write their own responses to the prompt (or to any other prompt that you want to give them).
2 Have the students work in small groups to edit the spellimg, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar in their responses.
3 Have the students analyze the syntax (through clauses)  of the response (or a part of it) that they themselves wrote. 
4 Have the students work in small groups to check their analysis. (As they do so, the teacher can answer any quesitons they have about constructions that they have not yet studied.)
5 Have the students make a graph of the main clauses in their own writing. [See the "Introduction."]
6 In small groups (rearranged so that they will be working with different people), have them discuss their use of adjectives, adverbs, prepositional phrases, strong verbs, and specific nouns in their own written responses. [Obviously you can also have the students discuss the ideas, content, organization, etc. in their responses.]
7 Have the students revise their written responses to the prompt by combining sentences and by adding adjectives, adverbs, prepositional phrases and, if helpful, additional sentences. Can they replace one abstract word with several concrete words?
8 Have the students work in small groups to edit the spellimg, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar in their revisions.
9 Have the students analyze the syntax (through clauses)  of their revisions.
10 Have the students work in small groups to check their analysis. 
11 Have the students make a graph of the main clauses in their revision and compare it to the graph of the original.
12 Have the students write a very brief description, using grammatical terms, about what they did in revising their responses. Which sentences did they combine? Did they add adjectives, adverbs or prepositional phrases? Which ones, and where? Did they replace abstract words with several concrete examples?