The Printable KISS Grammar Workbooks Level 6.6 Syntax and Writing
The Death of Hyacinth
(1752-53) 
by 
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
(1696 -1770)
Model Sentences from
"Hyacinthus" (Adapted from Ovid)

    Study the use of compounded verbs in this passage:

     It happened on a day that the two friends stripped off their garments, rubbed the juice of the olive upon their bodies, and engaged in throwing the quoit. First Apollo poised it and tossed it far. It cleaved the air with its weight and fell heavily to earth.  At that moment Hyacinthus ran forwards and hastened to take up the disc, but the hard earth sent it rebounding straight into his face, so that he fell wounded to the ground.

Note that the first sentence has a plural subject ("friends") that refers to people. Three verbs ("stripped," "rubbed," and "engaged") all connect to this subject. The next sentence identifies one of the people ("Apollo") referred to in the preceding sentence, and two verbs (poised" and "tossed") are used to denote what this person did. The next sentence identifies something that this person was using ("It"), and again two verbs ("cleaved" and "fell") are used to relate what it did. Then the writer shifts to the other person ("Hyacinthus"), and, once again two verbs ("ran" and "hastened") explain what this person did.
     Write four sentences to create a sequence of actions. The sentences should match the described pattern of subjects and verbs, but you may, if you wish, have the sentence about the thing relate to the actions of the second person you describe. First, concentrate on the sequence of action in simple sentences. For example:

     The two students arrived at the tennis court, opened a new can of tennis balls, and practiced a few strokes. Sarah kept her eye on the ball and hit every ball into the court. Bob, however, wanted to show his strength and hit a ball hard. It sailed over the fence and landed in the bushes.

Then revise what you have written by adding adjectives, adverbs, prepositional phrases, or other words, including, if you wish, additional S/V/C patterns:

     At five o'clock, the two students eagerly arrived at the tennis court, opened a new can of Wilson tennis balls, and practiced a few serves and returns. Sarah kept her eye carefully on the ball and hit every ball into the court, always in bounds. Bob, however, proudly wanted to show his strength and hit a ball as  hard as he could. It sailed two feet over the fence and landed somewhere in the thicket of bushes.

In your final copy, underline the subjects that match the original pattern once, and the verbs twice so that your teacher can easily see how you matched the pattern.